cut rosemary focaccia

Rosemary Focaccia Bread

VeganVegetarian

Another weakness of ours. It is as easy to have a weakness for Rosemary Focaccia Bread as it is to have it for pizza because they are related. Today I share with you my version; after lots of trial and error, I am pleased with it.

What is Focaccia?

Focaccia is a flat oven-baked Italian bread similar in style and texture to pizza dough. You can use it as a side to many meals or as sandwich bread. In Italy, it is even a snack. It is widespread to go into a bakery and just ask for a piece of this delicious bread.

Italians consider Focaccia a Ligurian bread, but there are many different variations in Italy’s regions, which come with various ingredients commonly put on top.

There’s the Focaccia Alla Genovese, Focaccia al Rosmarino (Rosemary Focaccia Bread), Focaccia with Onions, Focaccia with Cheese, the list goes on and on. The ones commonly found even in mainstream supermarkets are onions or olive ones, which I recommend if you want to make an interesting variation.

Woman cutting focaccia
Joaco’s mom Focaccia

As you may know, in Italy, it is imperative to call things by their name, so many Italians would say that this is not a Focaccia, judging by their idea of a Focaccia. I am usually cautious with this, but today I am making an exception for two reasons:

Simply because, just as with pizza, the versions are countless, so I am taking the liberty to call this:  My Focaccia version.

Even amongst Italians, if you go online, you can find tens of thousands of variations, so how can another variation harm the world?

I love Semolina and the sandy, dusty effect it has on bread and pizza. In my opinion, Semolina just makes bread and pizzas have more of a Sourdough texture, which I am all in for.

Very important Tips if New to Baking!

FLOUR

Flour type is a big deal when it comes to baking. I learned it the hard way. You just can’t use any flour for any dish. The zeros define the amount of gluten (protein) a given flour type has, thus what the flour is good for.

The fewer zeros, the more gluten, and gluten is the protein that makes a dough raise. If you use a multipurpose flour (most likely a 000), it will not grow as a 0 or 00 one.

raw rosemary focacciacooked rosemary focaccia
Rosemary Focaccia: Before and After

Flours used for baking cakes are most likely the 0000 type because you don’t want your cake to lose its shape.

There is no better or worse flour; you just need to know what you want it for.

YEAST

Yeasts are microorganisms from the fungus kingdom. They are alive; they hate salt and love sugar. When you use salt, make sure it doesn’t come in direct contact with yeast; it will kill it, the same way hot water will. Yeasts like warm water and sweets, don’t we all?

Without any other tips, here is the Focaccia! Let me now how it goes!

cooked rosemary focaccia

Rosemary Focaccia Bread

Gus
Flat oven-baked Italian bread similar in style and texture to pizza dough. You can use it as a side to many meals or as sandwich bread.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 25 mins
Resting Time 3 hrs 30 mins
Total Time 4 hrs 15 mins
Course Appetizer, Sides, Snack
Cuisine Italian, Plant-based, Vegan, Vegetarian
Servings 18 Servings
Calories 152 kcal

Equipment

  • Baking Pan

Ingredients
  

  • 1 pound 0 Flour Full Strength Manitoba flour
  • 3.5 ounces Semolina hard durum wheat
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil extra-virgin
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons coarse salt
  • 2 tablespoons cane sugar
  • 0.35 ounce brewer’s yeast dry
  • 1 ⅓ cups water warm
  • 1 sprig rosemary fresh, it’s OK if you only have dry

Instructions
 

  • Dilute the sugar and yeast in the water. Let it rest for 10 minutes. You should see some bubbles on top of the mix.
  • Meanwhile, mix in a bowl 400 gr of the 0 Flour, the Semolina, two fine salt tbsp and 2 tbsp of the olive oil.
  • Add the yeast water. Mix it. It should be sticky.
  • Take out of the bowl and stretch and fold it for 20 minutes, adding the remaining 100 gr of flour when needed.
  • Divide the dough into two pieces.
  • Stretch each one into a rectangle, and fold in three parts, like folding a letter.
  • Leave the “closing.”
  • Place each piece on an oiled pan. Put some olive oil on top of each piece until they are fully covered, and then cover them with plastic wrap. Air is the worst enemy of your dough. It will make a hard crust on it if you leave it uncovered.
  • Let it rise for 30 minutes close to a warm place in your kitchen or close to a heater.
  • Take the raised dough, fold it in thirds again, and give it a rectangle shape to cover your pan.
  • Let it rise for a minimum of 3 hours.
  • Pre-heat your oven at 250 Celcius or 480 Fahrenheits.
  • Press your fingers on the dough.
  • Add the remaining oil, so it covers the “valleys” that your fingers left.
  • Add the coarse salt and the rosemary sprigs.
  • Put any oven-resistant pan on the bottom of the oven with 2 cups of water (this helps to ensure the same temperature is kept in all the ovens if you don’t have an oven with a fan).
  • Bake the Focaccia for 15 mins or until golden on top, without opening the oven in the process.

Notes

If you are not making two focaccias, use the second piece for a pizza, that’s what I do. The same dough works perfectly; I just eliminate the extra oil, the rosemary, and the coarse salt.

Nutrition

Calories: 152kcalCarbohydrates: 24gProtein: 4gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 1552mgPotassium: 41mgFiber: 1gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 1IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 6mgIron: 1mg
Keyword bread, focaccia
Did you make this recipe?Mention @ourplantbasedworld or tag #ourplantbasedworld!

Nutrition Facts
Rosemary Focaccia Bread
Amount per Serving
Calories
152
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
4
g
6
%
Saturated Fat
 
1
g
6
%
Sodium
 
1552
mg
67
%
Potassium
 
41
mg
1
%
Carbohydrates
 
24
g
8
%
Fiber
 
1
g
4
%
Sugar
 
1
g
1
%
Protein
 
4
g
8
%
Vitamin A
 
1
IU
0
%
Vitamin C
 
1
mg
1
%
Calcium
 
6
mg
1
%
Iron
 
1
mg
6
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

More Italian Inspiration?

More Italian Inspiration?

Saffron Risotto

Lemony Spaghetti

I couldn’t find the exact brands of flour and Semolina I use here in Italy, but these two should make it. Important is to have a Manitoba One Zero Flour and a Hard Durum Wheat Semola.

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